Policies & Utilization

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  • How to Use Your Airplane for Business

    How to Use Your Airplane for Business

    This NBAA primer will introduce you to the advantages of using your airplane for business purposes and help you identify steps you can take to pursue this goal.
    View the resource.

  • LBA Flight Operations Manual Template

    LBA Flight Operations Manual Template

    The prospect of creating a flight operations manual can seem overwhelming for single pilots and light business airplane (LBA) owners and operators. To address this concern, NBAA created a resource designed specifically to meet the needs of LBA operators in creating or updating a flight operations manual. Learn More.

  • Business Aircraft Use Policy Guide

    Business Aircraft Use Policy Guide

    It’s important for businesses to have clear, board-approved policies for use of the aircraft to ensure there is no misuse or abuse of this business tool. NBAA has created a resource to guide the creation of these policies. Learn More.

  • Carriage of Candidates and Elected Officials

    Carriage of Candidates and Elected Officials

    The Federal Election Commission, Internal Revenue Service, and Federal Aviation Administration all regulate candidate and elected official travel. This section provides updated information for Members interested in providing transportation to a candidate or elected official. Learn More.

  • Non-Business Use of Employer-Provided Aircraft

    Non-Business Use of Employer-Provided Aircraft

    Businesses must be familiar with rules relating to non-business use of employer-provided aircraft, including Federal Aviation Administration, Internal Revenue Service and Securities and Exchange Commission. This section provides members with the latest regulatory information and best practices to manage the non-business use of employer-provided aircraft.


News & Resources

NBAA Flight Plan Podcast: Experts Discuss Importance of Aircraft Use Policies
Dec. 7, 2015
In this edition of NBAA Flight Plan, Cliff Maine, chairman of the Aviation Law Group at law firm Barnes & Thornburg, talks about the value of having a defined aircraft use policy, particularly when two people request that aircraft for the same time. "I always tell clients your biggest asset's not on the balance sheet, it's the morale of your employees," said Maine, "That's a real important thing in how you deal with conflicts, and try and let everyone know they're important and part of the team." Without a use policy in place, you run the risk of playing favorites. Listen to the podcast.
How to Develop an Aircraft Use Policy
Nov. 23, 2015
Every NBAA member should have a flight operations manual with policies and procedures for maintenance schedules, pilot duty times, flying limitations and other operational considerations. But a flight department needs more than guidance on how the aircraft will be operated safely and efficiently; it needs policies for how the aircraft will be used in the course of business. Having an aircraft utilization policy helps set expectations for everyone – from the management team and board of directors to passengers and flight department staff. Learn more about developing an aircraft use policy in Business Aviation Insider.
The View from the Corner Office, Best Practices in Business Aviation Policies & Procedures
May 3, 2009
This article, by James E. Lara of Gray Stone Advisors, addresses how the “C-Suite” expects business aviation leaders to optimize the contribution of flight department to enterprise performance and the enhanceme shareholder value. Review the article (PDF, 120 KB).
Explaining Why Your Company Relies on Business Aviation: Questions and Answers
April 6, 2009
Business aviation is often misunderstood by the media, shareholders, elected officials and others. This document, assembled by NBAA's Corporate Aviation Management Committee, helps confront misperceptions by providing the most common questions about a company's use of business aviation, and offering some helpful answers. Review the Q&A.
Applying for Relief from FAA Regulations
January 5, 2009
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) provides three methods for obtaining relief from provisions of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) 14 CFR Parts 1-199: exemption, waiver and deviation. This article by Aaron Goerlich and Jason Maddux, of Garofalo Goerlich Hainbach PC, describes application process for each option. Review the article.