Region I: North America

Bookmark and Share

Regional Leads

Members, please login for more contact information

  • Region I (NAM) Lead: Mike Lowry, SkyRiver Management

News

Significant Airspace Changes Coming Nov. 13 Across the U.S., Canada

Oct. 9, 2014
Following rollouts earlier this year of procedure and routing changes in airspace over Texas, an unprecedented series of optimizations will begin next month as the FAA proceeds with extensive changes to airspace nationwide. Perhaps the most significant change is the Windsor/Toronto/Montreal (WTM)/Northeast U.S. Airspace Redesign, a collaboration between the FAA and Nav Canada, with the latter entity leading the project. In all, these changes encompass skies controlled by eight air route traffic control centers, with the most significant changes occurring in U.S. and Canadian airspace encompassing Toronto, Windsor and Montreal, Canada; Boston, MA; Washington, DC; and New York. Routes as far south as Tennessee and South Carolina will also be affected. Learn more about the coming airspace changes.

Mexico Relaxes APIS Requirements

Oct. 6, 2014
Mexico recently relaxed its advanced passenger information system (APIS) manifest filing requirements offering the option to file manifests directly without using a third-party provider. In an effort to curb ongoing cabotage violations, Mexico expanded the APIS filing requirement to general aviation operations on Jan. 1, 2014, and at that time only accepted submissions from flight planning providers. While Mexico continues to develop a public portal allowing for direct Internet submissions, the Instituto Nacional de Migración is now accepting APIS manifests filed directly by aircraft operators for flights arriving in or departing from Mexico. "This is a welcome change in Mexico's APIS filing process," said Sarah Wolf, NBAA’s senior manager, security and facilitation. "The more flexible filing process will allow Member Companies that choose to file independently to do so, which will save expense and time." Learn more about new APIS requirements.

Mexico Lifts Some Restrictions on Non-Revenue Flights

June 2, 2014
Flying to and within Mexico just got much less restrictive for U.S. and foreign-based operators flying aircraft listed on a charter certificate but conducting private, non-revenue operations to Mexico. The Mexican aviation agency, DGAC, recently made changes to previous rules put in place on April 7 of this year. The new rules clarify that operators with aircraft listed on a charter certificate are once again allowed to operate those same aircraft to Mexico as private, non-revenue flights. "We are pleased that the Mexican authorities lifted these restrictions and restored a proven system that allows for the safe monitoring of general aviation operations," said Peter Korns, NBAA operations specialist. Read more about changes to Mexico's flight restrictions.

Expanded Mexican API Requirements and Compliance Options

Jan. 6, 2014
Last month, NBAA reported that Mexico adopted legislation requiring private operators to submit API data effective on Dec. 31, 2013. That mandate was quickly implemented Nacional de Migracion law, which follows the previously established requirements held for commercial operations. For Members wanting to take the confusion and complexity out of compliance with Mexico's new API requirements, NBAA Operations Specialist Peter Korns notes that the Association has a tool available to ease compliance with the new requirements. Learn more about the expanded API requirements.

Mexico Implements Passenger Information Mandate for All Flights Starting Dec. 31

Dec. 24, 2013
When Mexico's new Advance Passenger Information (API) requirement for arriving and departing flights launches on Dec. 31, it will be applicable to all flights, including FAR Part 135 and Part 91 operations, as well as commercial operations. The new law puts administration of Mexico's API under the authority of the National Immigration Institute, and the policy covers both aviation and maritime vessels. Reporting must be done electronically after doors have closed for flights departing for Mexico lasting less than an hour, and 30 minutes before departure for longer flights. Learn more about Mexico's new API requirement.

FAR 91 Operators May Fly in Canada Without Special Authority

Dec. 20, 2013
Foreign private operators, including FAR U.S. Part 91 operators, can continue to operate into, out of and through Canada without the necessity of obtaining any technical competency authority from Transport Canada (Foreign Air Operators Certificate) or any economic authority from the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA). "The operation of corporate aircraft by an organization for the use and transportation of its officials...in the conduct of the organization's business is generally also considered to be private carriage, and not a publicly available service and, therefore, an agency licence would not be required to operate this service," the CTA decision states. An article prepared by William F. Clark, of Clark & Company, has additional information. Read more.

CBAA Seeks Chief Executive to Broaden Advocacy in Canada, Globally

March 28, 2013
The Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA) is searching for a new president and chief executive officer to guide the organization in its expanded role as advocates on behalf of business aviation interests before international aviation bodies, as well as with Canadian regulators. The CBAA board of directors intends to begin the interview process in early April, said Jean Menard, CBAA's treasurer and chairman of the selection committee. The new leader will succeed Sam Barone, who stepped down March 17 to become vice chair of the Canadian Transportation Agency. Read more about the CBAA.

FAA Makes Change in New York Center Oceanic Clearance Procedures

January 28, 2013
The FAA has announced it will modify procedures used to issue oceanic clearances to eastbound aircraft entering minimum navigation performance standard (MNPS) airspace in the New York Center Oceanic Control Area (CTA) from an FAA facility. The FAA is changing the delivery method of the three components to an oceanic clearance – route, altitude and speed. Effective Feb. 5 at 7 a.m., the FAA will consider the airport clearance an aircraft receives on the ground before departure to be the route portion of the clearance. Altitude and speed assignments will be given prior to entry into the New York Center Oceanic CTA. View the FAA notice (PDF).

Registration Underway for Cross-Border Issues Conference

October 9, 2012
Online registration is now available for the Cross-Borders Issues Conference, to be held in Canada's capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, on Dec. 6 and 7, 2012. The conference, co-sponsored by NBAA and the Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA), will bring together government officials and industry experts on border-related concerns, and address common challenges faced by operators transporting business aircraft passengers across the border between the United States and Canada. New for this year, the conference will cover some of the most talked about issues in business aviation, such as the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) and use of iPads on the flight deck. Learn more about the conference.

Past DUI Convictions May Keep Pilots Out of Canada

July 20, 2012
Business aviation operators flying into Canada should be aware of that country’s strict immigration policy regarding U.S. citizens entering the country who have been convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol, which is a felony in the U.S. Bill Stine, NBAA’s director of international operations, said that the Association receives several complaints each year from NBAA Members who have been denied access into Canada. “Anyone who is convicted of a felony is considered ‘criminally inadmissible’ into Canada under its Immigration and Refugee Protection Act,” Stine said. “However, there are provisions that render someone eligible for ‘deemed rehabilitation’ for entry purposes into Canada if the DUI happened 10 or more years ago.” Read more about Canada’s policies on DUI offenses.

Nav Canada Changes SID/STAR ATC Procedures

January 16, 2012
Nav Canada implemented a major change in Canadian ATC procedures that will require aircraft to comply with published SID/STAR altitude restrictions unless they are explicitly cancelled by ATC. An aircraft that is assigned a SID/STAR, and then assigned a higher/lower altitude is still expected to comply with any published altitude restrictions on that SID/STAR while climbing/descending to the new assigned altitude unless ATC specifically states “all STAR altitude restrictions cancelled.” This change differs from U.S. ATC procedures contained in AIM Section 4-4-10g, which states that any new altitude clearance cancels any previous altitude clearance and any published altitude restrictions on a SID or STAR unless the restrictions are restated by the controller. Aircrew are encouraged to add this as a special briefing item prior to traveling to any airport in Canada with published STARs or SIDs (conventional or RNAV). Learn More.

Canadian Group Launches Effort to Highlight Business Aviation Benefits

September 30, 2011
The Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA) recently launched “Business Aviation Works,” a campaign to promote the importance of business aviation operations throughout the country, and educate those seeking to stymie the Canadian industry with new rules and fees. CBAA president and CEO Sam Barone noted Business Aviation Works is similar to the No Plane, No Gain advocacy campaign, but “on a Canadian scale.” Learn more.

When Flying Internationally, Be Aware of Cabotage Rules

August 15, 2011
Failure to comply with regulations involving cabotage – the commercial transport of goods or people between two points in one country, onboard an aircraft registered in another – can result in serious consequences. If your next mission takes you across the U.S. border, are you up to speed on cabotage requirements? NBAA discussed this issue with Sam Barone, president and CEO of the Canadian Business Aviation Association, the topic will also be discussed at the upcoming CBAA/NBAA Cross-Borders Issues Conference, to be held December 8-9 at the Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel. Learn more.

CBAA Convention to Highlight 50 Years of Advocacy

July 3, 2011
Canada and the United States may be separated by a border on the ground, but both countries share many common issues affecting business aviation. The Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA) has worked for 50 years to represent operators in that country, a milestone the group will celebrate during its annual convention July 6-7 in Calgary, Alberta. NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen will be a keynote speaker at the event. Learn more.

Slot Reservation Requirement Eased for Flights to Toronto

December 16, 2010
For operators going to Toronto’s Lester B. Pearson International Airport (CYYZ), the requirement for arrival and departure slots has been removed between 1500 and 1959 local time Sunday through Friday for a period of one year.  This is the result a recent analysis that concluded CYYZ has sufficient capacity so as not to require the slots during these peak hours.  The one-year moratorium is in place, effective immediately, after which the situation will be reassessed.  For more information, view the Greater Toronto Airport Authority (GTAA) Directive.

November 18, 2009
The Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) implemented a new Night Flight Restriction Program (NFRP) on November 1, 2009. All Stage 3 or Stage 4 aircraft not operating on a scheduled and repetitive basis are required to request permission to operate during the restricted hours of 12:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. local time by contacting the Resource Management Unit on the day of operation at (416) 776-3480 or (800) 267-7568. Operations of Stage 2 aircraft are not permitted from midnight to 7:00 a.m. local time. The Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA) will be meeting with airport authorities to advocate for a fair and equitable allocation of slots to be made available to business aviation. View the NFRP.

July 23, 2009
There are a number of requirements for those operating business aircraft to the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics Games, which will be held in February 2010. NBAA has created an online resource, based upon information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), NAV Canada, and the Canadian Business Aviation Association (CBAA), providing guidance regarding the procedures for gaining access to the Vancouver area during the games. To view the resource, visit http://www.nbaa.org/olympics.

Canada to Implement Line-Up-and-Wait Phraseology

April 7, 2008
In Canada, controllers currently use the phraseology "taxi to position" or "taxi to position and wait" when instructing aircraft to enter the departure runway. While most air traffic control phraseology used in Canada conforms with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recommendations, there are certain differences. Beginning April 10, in an effort to conform with international best practices, Canada will adopt the ICAO-recommended phraseology "line up" or "line up and wait" when controllers instruct an aircraft to enter the runway intended for takeoff. While not planning to implement it at this time, the FAA is studying the issue for the future. For this reason, pilots should be alert to different phraseologies that may be encountered when operating near runway thresholds. For additional information, download the aeronautical information circular.

New U.S. Passport Requirements for Air Travel Take Effect Jan. 23

December 4, 2006
Beginning January 23, all persons, including U.S. citizens, entering the United States by air from the Americas, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda will be required to have a valid and current passport. For more information, visit the U.S. Department of State web site.

Revised Nav Canada Airport Fees for Light Aircraft

July 18, 2006
Nav Canada has announced that, after legal challenges have been being suppressed, new charges of Can$10 per day, with an annual maximum of Can$1,200, will become effective March 1, 2008, and apply to aircraft weighing 3 tonnes (6,614 lbs.) or less at the following international airports: Vancouver (including the water aerodrome), Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto (Pearson), Ottawa (Macdonald-Cartier) and Montreal (Trudeau). Nav Canada is the country's private civil air navigation services provider. A history of previous service charges and a flight planning calculator of current fees are available from the Services section of the Nav Canada web site at http://www.navcanada.ca.