Region VI: Africa

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Regional Leads

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  • Region VI (AFI) Lead: Francisca Susan Mashibe, Tanzanite Jet Centre Ltd
African Trade Mission Visits NBAA for Discussions on Improving General Aviation
Oct. 30, 2014
Seeking information about how to better support aviation in Africa, and make it more efficient, productive and economical, a 20-member delegation visited NBAA's Washington, DC headquarters on Oct. 28, after spending three days in Orlando, FL at NBAA's Business Aviation Convention & Exhibition (NBAA2014). NBAA's Chief Operating Officer Steve Brown said he spoke to the delegates about "how the United States regulates business aviation and how NBAA engages with all levels of government – local, state, and federal – and the media to improve the safety, security and efficiency of our members' operations." Sponsored by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency, the group was scheduled for a 12-day visit to the U.S. Read more about the African delegates visit to NBAA.
Ebola-Related Flight Restrictions Affecting African Air Travel
Aug. 29, 2014
Business aircraft operators should be aware that concern about the Ebola virus is beginning to affect air travel in a number of African countries. Flight restrictions of varying kinds are in place for Senegal, the Ivory Coast and Cape Verde, and the nations of Chad and Zambia are also beginning to close their borders to certain aircraft and passengers. "We strongly urge any business aircraft operators to check ahead when flying to the countries currently being affected by the Ebola virus," said Susan Mashibe, founder and CEO of VIA Aviation Ltd., an East African FBO with headquarters at Tanzania's Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO). "We are already aware of one business aircraft operator that was denied entry to the Ivory Coast because the flight originated from an Ebola-affected country." Learn more about flight restrictions in Africa.
AfBAA Promotes Business Aviation as Economic Development Tool in Africa
March 12, 2013
Lacking reliable roads, rails or scheduled air service to every corner of its 11.7 million square miles, Africa's 1 billion people and 54 nations need business aviation. AfBAA Executive Director Rady Fahmy, Executive Director of the African Business Aviation Association has a goal of establishing business aviation as an "asset that is recognized, valued and supported by governments, their respective aviation authorities, enterprises, entrepreneurs and business leaders." Learn more about bringing business aviation to Africa.
IATA Makes Change to In-Flight Broadcast Procedure for Africa Region
January 25, 2013
To reduce the risk of incidents during high-traffic periods, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) has made a change to in-flight broadcast procedure (IFBP) for the African Flight Region (AFI). Effective Mar. 7, ten minutes before entering the AFI, pilots will be required to monitor and report on 126.9 MHz. If departing an airport within the region, monitoring is expected to start as soon as appropriate and continue until clear of AFI airspace. A list of occasions when reports will be required and items to be included in each report is available in the IATA notice. Review the updated IATA IFBP.
African Business Aviation Association Forming
April 23, 2012
Jack Olcott, past president of NBAA, is helping form the African Business Aviation Association (AFBAA). The group held its first meeting in December 2011 and about 10 operators and manufacturers have been involved in establishing AFBAA's mission statement, bylaws and policies. "Having an 'umbrella' organization allows the African business aviation community to speak with one voice," said Olcott. "This will be a very positive development for Africa, and for the global business aviation community." Read more about the new association in Africa.
U.S. Government Moves to Prohibit Flights Over Libya
March 23, 2011
Citing “safety and national security concerns,” the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on March 20 issued a Notice To Airmen (NOTAM) and a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) prohibiting U.S. civilian flights over Libya. SFARs are used to define requirements that are not included in existing regulations; this one notes: “An armed conflict is ongoing in Libya and presents a potential hazard to civil aviation.” Specific hazards listed in the SFAR included damaged pavement on runways at Libya’s international airports at Benghazi and Tripoli and possible loss of air navigation services. Learn more and read the SFAR.