Japan Crisis

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Updated March 25, 2011

Following the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan on March 11, 2011, severe operational and logistical challenges have been faced by humanitarian relief organizations and business aircraft operators who must move equipment and personnel to and from the region.

Aircraft operators are encouraged to the review the following resources, and check for the most up-to-date NOTAMs before undertaking operations in the affected region.

If you have questions, or would like to report a change that would impact aircraft operations in the region, please content NBAA’s Operations Service Group at at (202) 783-9250 or [email protected].

Airspace Restrictions

Previous NOTAMs establishing a 10km inner ring and a 20km outer ring around the Fukushima nuclear plant, have been replaced by NOTAM B1080/11, which changes this to a 30km "no-fly zone" ring.

B1080/11 - IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ARTICLE 80 OF CIVIL AERONAUTICS LAW, FLT PROHIBITED AREA IS ESTABLISHED AS FLW,
IDENTIFICATION : RJP1 AREA : WI A RADIUS OF 30KM FM 372529N1410158E (THE TOKYO ELECTRIC POWER CO.INC. FUKUSHIMA NO.1, OKUMA-FUTABA-CHO FUTABA-GUN IN FUKUSHIMA)
RMK/SEE AIP ENR 5.3-29. SFC - UNL, 15 MAR 02:59 2011 UNTIL PERM.
CREATED: 15 MAR 03:03 2011

Airport Access

Japan Schedule Coordination, an organization of the Japan Aeronautic Association is providing updates on any restrictions on air travel to Japan. For the latest information, review their website.

At this time, Sendai airport (RJSS) is still reported to be closed. Reports also indicate that Narita (RJAA), Haneda (RJTT) and Chitose (RJCC) airports are only open to relief flights. Operators are encouraged to work with a qualified international service provider to determine the latest airport status in Japan as conditions are changing quickly.

State Department Travel Warning

On March 21, the State Department issued an updated travel warning for Japan. Consistent with government guidelines that would apply to such a situation in the United States, the State Department is recommending, as a precaution, that U.S. citizens within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant evacuate the area or to take shelter indoors if safe evacuation is not practical. Review the travel warning.

Relief Efforts

AERObridge Request for Aircraft Support

In response to the earthquake in Japan, AERObridge is working with partners to take advantage of space on passenger/cargo jets to Japan. AERObridge is assisting with transportation of small search and urban rescue teams and medical assessment teams. If any flight departments are traveling to Japan in the immediate future and have empty seats, please consider donating those seats to personnel who need to reach the disaster area. Several airlines are also making space available to relief teams, there is a need to transport team members to Los Angeles, Seattle and Phoenix in order to take advantage of these offers. AERObridge is a non-profit staffed by volunteers whose mission is to provide rapid transportation of critically needed supplies and personnel into disaster zones. For more information, contact AERObridge at (951) 491-9827 or [email protected].

NBAA Humanitarian Emergency Response Operator (HERO) Database

Business aviation has long served as a lifeline to people and communities in crisis. That's because business aircraft can reach locations impacted by natural disasters, when airliners and sometimes even automobiles cannot. Business aircraft can operate on short notice into outlying airports with small runways, and sometimes unpaved airstrips, or even onto roads – they are uniquely suited to providing a first response to natural disasters and other emergencies. The NBAA Humanitarian Emergency Response Operator (HERO) Database is a list of people in the business aviation community who are part of disaster-response mobilization efforts. In the aftermath of major crises, basic information from the database is provided to organizations coordinating relief efforts. Learn more.