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Scottsdale, AZ Touts Value of Airpark in New Video

December 26, 2012

A new video produced by the city of Scottsdale, AZ touts the $3 billion economic impact of its airpark in an effort to convince more businesses to join the 2,200 companies already in the flourishing 8.5-square miles Scottsdale Airpark.

The video, which features business owners talking about why they located to the airpark, is already running on both Scottsdale Airport’s (SDL) website and on the city’s YouTube channel. It is also broadcast at regular intervals on Channel 11 in Scottsdale. Either links to the video, or coverage of it, are appearing in online publications, as well as in several publications that cover the airpark.

“Think of it as a business park with a runway,” said Kelly Corsette, communications and public affairs director for the city of Scottsdale. “Not just any business park, but a ‘clean industry’ business park with a fully equipped airport.”

The title of the video is “Scottsdale Airpark: Business Takes Flight,” and NBAA’s Southwest Region Representative Stacy Howard said, “I couldn’t have said it better myself. It’s a well-done video complement to the No Plane No Gain campaign.”

Scottsdale Airpark is the second-largest employment area in Arizona, with almost 48,000 employees working at businesses, like Discount Tire, Taser International, Global Dental and WestRoc Hotels and Resorts. There are 30 companies that have chosen the airpark for their headquarters, even some that do not own business airplanes.

“Boccieri Golf, for instance,” said Corsette. “They make custom golf clubs. It’s a small company, and they located in our airpark for several reasons, but owning an aircraft wasn’t one of them. They regularly have customers fly in, hop in a car and walk through the company’s front door two minutes later.

“People would be surprised at the types of companies that cluster around an airport, certainly in our case,” Corsette added. “Most are smaller businesses with just a handful of employees, the kind elected officials refer to as ‘job creators.’”

Aside from aviation-specific businesses, companies in the airpark include manufacturers, clean industry, technology firms and those involved in recreation and tourism.